Every Day Should be Memorial Day

You might think of this as a late Memorial Day post, but it’s not.  It’s a very poignant piece from AR contributor Michelle Zhang, and it’s right on time.
- Editor (Robert Wallace)

The official Memorial Day happened on a beautiful day here in Philadelphia, PA. After a weekend of barbeques a friend and I decided to spend the day at America’s First Zoo. A zoo that first opened its doors on July 1, 1874.

Why am I saying all this? Because the reason that I was able to enjoy a nice day outside and every other day of my life here in this country is because of the men and women who fought to protect the rights and the freedoms that we love and cherish, and that many of us take for granted.

Today is not Memorial Day, but it should be. Everyday should be a Memorial Day. We should never forget and always honor these brave people. Like General Patton once said, we should be glad not only that they died protecting us, but that they also lived protecting us.

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Comments

  1. Boston Blackie says:

    Thank you, Michelle. I showed your comments to my husband, a Vietnam vet Marine. He said that of course it takes a naturalized citizen to truly understand the word ‘freedom’ and the cost involved.
    With Jeff up his eyeballs for the next couple of months, I hope you will think about doing an Independence Day piece as well.

  2. William A. Rose says:

    Agreed.

  3. Gail B. says:

    This came as a shocker from the Department of Defense:

    Soldier Missing From Korean War Identified

    The Department of Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, missing in action from the Korean War, have been identified and returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

    Army Master Sgt. Roy E. Head of Clinchport, Va., will be buried Saturday in Duffield, Va. Head was assigned to Headquarters Company, 49th Field Artillery Battalion. After the 1953 armistice, it was learned from surviving POWs that he had been captured in February 1951, marched north to a POW camp in Suan County, North Korea, and died of malnutrition a few months later. Between 1991 and 1994, North Korea gave the United States 208 boxes of remains believed to contain the remains of 200-400 U.S. servicemen. North Korean documents turned over with one of the boxes indicated the remains were exhumed near Suan County. This location correlates with Head’s last known location.

    Analysts from DPMO developed case leads with information spanning more than 58 years. Through interviews with surviving POW eyewitnesses, experts validated circumstances surrounding the soldier’s captivity and death, confirming wartime documentation of his loss.

    Among other forensic identification tools and circumstantial evidence, scientists from the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command and the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory also used dental comparisons and mitochondrial DNA – which matched that of two of his brothers — in the identification of the remains.

    More than 2,000 servicemen died as prisoners of war during the Korean War. With this accounting, 8,025 service members still remain missing from the conflict.

    For additional information on the Defense Department’s mission to account for missing Americans, visit the DPMO Web site at http://www.dtic.mil/dpmo or call 703- 699-1169.

    U.S. Department of Defense
    Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Public Affairs)

    On the Web: http://www.defense.gov/releases/
    ==================================================================

    It’s bad enough that our military personnel had to fight a war to begin with, but to spend years in a POW camp–and then be brought home in a box more than half a century later–and be identified by the DNA of nearest kin!!! OUTRAGEOUS!

    I shared this because I didn’t want Army Master Sgt. Roy E. Head and the 8,025 service members still missing in the Korean War — and the many more from other wars — to be forgotten.

  4. Gail B. says:

    I hope Jeff can find his new laptop and router when he gets moved! I hope he doesn’t run short of funds. I hope nothing gets broken or lost. Moving is stressful, folks. I just wonder if Jeff will notice any difference in his stress level!

    I just didn’t know where to say all of that. Sorry to be off topic, but he’s a bit of a hero, too, in a different sort of “war.”

  5. Gail B. says:

    Vet cuts down Illegal Mexican flag flying above U.S. Flag
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nONjlZ8YMkA

  6. Gail B. says:

    Also from the Department of Defense:

    Air Force Pilot Missing From Vietnam War Identified

    The Department of Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, missing in action from the Vietnam War, have been identified and returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

    Air Force Col. Elton L. Perrine of Pittsford, N.Y., was buried last week at Arlington National Cemetery near Washington, D.C. On May 22, 1967, Perrine and Capt. Kenneth F. Backus completed a nighttime strike against the Cao Nung Railroad Yard near the town of Kep in North Vietnam. Seconds after the bomb run, a nearby aircrew reported seeing an isolated explosion approximately three miles east of the target, thought to be Perrine’s F-4C Phantom aircraft crashing. Search and rescue attempts were not initiated due to heavy anti-aircraft fire in the area.

    Analysts from DPMO developed case leads with information spanning more than 28 years. Through interviews with eyewitnesses and research in the National Archives, four locations in Lang Son Province were pinpointed as potential crash sites, separated by as many as 10 miles.

    Between 1999 and 2008, U.S.-Socialist Republic of Vietnam teams, led by the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command, further analyzed leads, interviewed villagers, conducted two surveys and four excavations. The teams recovered small pieces of aircraft wreckage, human remains, personal effects and life-support equipment from the four locations.

    Among other forensic identification tools and circumstantial evidence, scientists from JPAC and the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory also used mitochondrial DNA – which matched that of Perrine’s mother – in the identification of his remains. No remains connected to Backus were recovered at the locations.

    For additional information on the Defense Department’s mission to account for missing Americans, visit the DPMO Web site at http://www.dtic.mil/dpmo.

  7. America says:

    “Justice and power must be brought together, so that whatever is just may be powerful, and whatever is powerful may be just.” ~Blaise Pascal

  8. PSYDOG says:

    Gail B. I watched the link you showed and thought it was great, Jim Brossard is a true American! Real Americans should have the same reaction whenever they see something like this going on.

  9. George S. P. says:

    Thanks to all the patriots who have suffered and died preserving freedom and liberty worldwide (you’re welcome France), and accept my apologies this generation (of politicians) has let it all slip away.

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