June 28, 2008 — Assigned Reading

Let McCain be McCain
(FROM: The Wall Street Journal) I don’t know if Peggy Noonan is correct that John McCain needs to go back to his old, no-tax-cuts, close-Guantanamo, open borders self, but I do think she is right in that this race will tighten between now and November — that is, if you believe it isn’t tight already. Her observation about the Google News stories, the discrepancy in coverage between Obama and McCain, is noteworthy. McCain is not only going to fight the forces of widespread Bush Derangement Syndrome, or the constant comparisons between him and the current unpopular president, but he will have to do it all while the mainstream media is doing everything they can to undermine his candidacy. Still, if McCain can loosen up and find that personality that people love, that along with an awakening as to the true character of his rival and a tough substantive debate may be enough for a win.

Pelosi Supports the Fairness Doctrine
(FROM: Human Events) So far, Obama has come out in favor of leaving things just the way they are. Pelosi, on the other hand, would like nothing more than to compete with talk radio and other alternative media in the only way they can — by forcing liberal thought. They tried the free market approach, and it failed. Watch this issue like a hawk, as Democratic party control of Congress and the White House, should Obama prevail in November, would mean a number of adverse issues come to pass, one of which is the reinstatement of the poorly-named “Fairness Doctrine.”

America’s Universities are Living a Diversity Lie
(FROM: The Wall Street Journal) Affirmative action, while necessary in years gone by, has run its course. One cannot advocate affirmative action and racial equality in the same sentence, as has been done for many years by civil rights advocates — the two ideas are diametrically opposed. If anyone tells you otherwise, please point out that an African American man named Barack Hussein Obama, who along with his wife went to some of the greatest schools in the country, may very well be the 44th President of the United States in a matter of months. The opportunity is there; Obama is living proof. Plus, despite his inability to properly read and understand our Constitution–that he taught Constitutional Law to impressionable young law students sends shivers down my spine–Obama is a very intelligent man. He didn’t need affirmative action to get into school. The idea has run its useful course, and we’ve got all the evidence in the world to prove it.

Who’s Planning Our Next War?
(FROM: Human Events) I understand the reason behind Pat Buchanan’s tone here, and I definitely believe that all of his questions and more need to be asked and answered before action is taken, yet the threat from Iran cannot be laughed off, cannot be sloughed off because of lack of support by the American public. Unlike Pat, I lack confidence in John and Jane Public to know what is best for the safety of our nation. The average American, I fear, cannot find Iran on a map or globe, nonetheless understand the political and diplomatic consequences to Iranian aggression or an American response. Yes, we need to weigh our options. Yes, we need to think things through. But no, we do not need a Rasmussen-type poll of Americans regarding conflict with Iran. Nukes are nukes, evil is evil, and sadly, many people don’t comprehend any of it.

Free Speech Dies at the UN: Human Rights Commission Bans Criticism of Islam
(FROM: FrontPage Magazine) Citing the “complexity” of religious issues, the president of the United Nations Human Rights Council decided that Islam will no longer be subject to criticism during debate. It supposedly applies to all religions, but the decision arose after–of course–complaints came from Muslim nations, who just this week voiced a desire to be present on the UN Security Council. How about saying “no” to these people once in a while? The very nature of effective debate demands that no subject be taboo; on the Human Rights Council in particular, how can you speak about human rights without being able to bring up the lives ruined and taken by religious zealots of all kinds? How do you NOT address the honor killings, the stoning of women supported by Islam? How can we learn to live with one another (or at the very least fight off Jihad) if we cannot even talk amongst ourselves?

CAIR’s Mum on Al-Qaeda Guilty Plea
(FROM: FrontPage Magazine) Just once, I’d really like to see millions of American Muslims demonstrating against and denouncing the actions being carried out in the name of their faith. Maybe a picket sign or a couple of banners would be like. Furthermore, where’s the news coverage? One of CAIR’s own … tied in with Al Qaeda?

Obama’s Long March
(FROM: TownHall) Charles Krauthammer, as always, is right. We are seeing softening of liberal positions, backtracking on arguments, friends of yestermonth thrown under the bus, all as Obama moves to the center. He already has the radical left. If he can effectively woo the center-left and center-center, two groups that McCain–who, unlike Obama, lacks the support of much of his base–has been romancing, the political right and America as a whole may be in trouble.

Conservatives Warm to McCain on the Law
(FROM: Politico) A few weeks ago, he had some great things to say about his [hopefully] eventual judicial nominations. This piece sums that up, and offers more evidence that conservatives may be able to relax … a little.

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Comments

  1. Anonymous says:

    “Affirmative action, while necessary in years gone by, has run its course. One cannot advocate affirmative action and racial equality in the same sentence, as has been done for many years by civil rights advocates — the two ideas are diametrically opposed. If anyone tells you otherwise, please point out that an African American man named Barack Hussein Obama, who along with his wife went to some of the greatest schools in the country, may very well be the 44th President of the United States in a matter of months. The opportunity is there; Obama is living proof.”

    I don’t understand the logic here. Sure, the opportunity is there. Minorities, women, etc are not specifically banned from being president or from going to prestigious schools. However, just pointing out that two people (the Obamas) were able to do it doesn’t mean that their opportunity was EQUAL to that of whites. Just because one woman somewhere gets to be CEO or partner at a law firm doesn’t mean her path there was just as easy as a man’s was. In order to say discrimination doesn’t exist you have to be able to point out how a population as a whole gets the same opportunities and the same amount of obstacles as another population. I think that’s impossible to prove. Race, gender and class (among other things) are still strong forces irrespective of merit.

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